bacon

Anasazi Bean® Soup

by Nancy on February 28, 2012

in Main Dish,Soups

After our Easter ham, my mother would save the ham bone and pan drippings to make a big pot of navy bean soup. It was a good, hearty soup for the still chilly days of spring. I still make the same soup but with a few changes. First of all, I no longer save the pan drippings. I usually get a spiral cut ham with honey glaze these days. The sugar and spices in the glaze get into the drippings and add a terrible flavor to soup. Likewise, I don’t use the ham bone for stock. I usually get a small ham as I’m not serving 15 or more people like my mother did and the ham bone just isn’t large enough to make much stock. I substitute chicken stock as ham stock is not made. And then I have switched from navy beans to Anasazi beans. Well, I still think of it as the same soup.

I use to think all dried beans were created equal but not anymore. Some beans like navy beans and Anasazi beans hold their shape well when cooked. Others like pinto beans get mushy and fall apart. That’s why pinto beans are used for refried beans, they mash easily, whereas navy beans or Anazasi beans do not mash well and refried beans made with them are mealy. Other beans such as black turtle beans have distinctive flavors.

Anasazi beans are my favorite soup bean. The name Anazasi Bean® is a trademark used to popularize the bean as a gourmet bean beginning in the 1980s. The bean is also called Aztec bean, cave bean, New Mexico Appaloosa and Jacob’s Cattle. The bean cooks quickly (for a bean), stays firm and has a little more flavor than some other dried beans.

The only other ingredient that you might not be familiar with is chipotle pepper. Chipotle peppers are jalapeno peppers that have been smoked and dried. The pepper gives a nice earthy taste and a little spice to the soup. I can buy the pepper either whole or ground. I use to buy it in the Mexican section of the grocery store but it is now in the regular spice section. I add either 1 whole pepper or 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper to the pot. I’m recommending that you start out with 1/8 teaspoon, add more if you like.

Anasazi Bean is a registered trademark of Adobe Milling in Dove Creek, Colorado.

Anasazi Bean Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Anasazi beans
  • 4 quarts water
  • 4 strips bacon or 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 cups diced cooked ham
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 1 cup diced carrots
  • 4 chicken bouillon cubes or chicken stock base for 2 quarts liquid
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried and ground chipotle pepper
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 bay leaves
  1. Degas beans by placing beans and 2 quarts of water in 3 quart cooking pot, bring to a boil, remove from heat and place lid on pot, let cool (about 1 hour), then drain beans discarding water. Anasazi beans cook quickly for beans and will be cooked or nearly so by the time the water cools. Remove beans from pot if you haven’t already and continue with same pot.
  2. If you choose to use bacon fry until fat is converted to oil. This will take about 5 minutes, stir occasionally. The bacon will be “floating” in oil and the fat will be covered with tiny bubbles when it is finished.
  3. Saute onion in bacon fat (I leave the bacon in the pot) or olive oil.
  4. Add beans and remainder of ingredients including 2-2 1/2 quarts of water and simmer until vegetables are done, 15-20 minutes.

 

 

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Potato Soup

by Nancy on February 17, 2011

in Main Dish,Soups,Vegetarian

This is an old-time classic family recipe. It’s a classic because you like it just the way it is. I have liked it just the way it is for over 50 years. Was I surprised when Carrie came up with a variation that I liked, well, maybe not better but just as good.

My mother’s classic version is vegetarian – potatoes, onions and celery in a thin white sauce base. Carrie added bacon in her version which adds a rich flavor.

The bacon version of this recipe uses fat from the bacon instead of margarine or butter to make the rue (flour/fat mixture used for thickening). You have to render the fat out of the bacon so you have a liquid oil that you can mix with the flour. Cut the bacon strips into 1/2″ pieces. Kitchen shears make quick work of this. Place pieces in saucepan and heat on high. Fry until fat is converted to oil. This will take about 5 minutes, stir occasionally. The bacon will be “floating” in oil and the fat will be covered with tiny bubbles when it is finished.

Potato Soup

  • 6 strips of bacon  or  1/3 cup margarine or butter
  • 4 T flour
  • 1 small diced onion
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 6 small red potatoes diced
  • 6 cups milk
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  1. In 3 quart saucepan fry bacon until crisp or melt margarine or butter.
  2. Add onion and saute in fat.
  3. Stir flour into fat. It’s OK if bacon and onion get mixed in too.
  4. Add 1 cup of milk, mix evenly into flour/fat mixture. Stir constantly until mixture boils and thickens.
  5. Stir in rest of milk. Add potatoes. Heat just to boiling and simmer until potatoes are done, about 20 minutes.

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Turkey Cranberry Sandwich

by Nancy on November 23, 2010

in Main Dish,Snacks

Here’s a great tasting sandwich that uses up leftover turkey and cranberry sauce. It’s a refreshing meal in the summertime with sliced deli turkey, too. Cream cheese works better than mayo to keep the cranberry sauce from soaking into the bread.

A sandwich can only be your favorite if you start with your favorite bread. I’ve made this with country potato bread, whole wheat bread and Kaiser roll.

Turkey Cranberry Sandwich

  • 1 1/2 ounces turkey
  • 2 slices bread
  • 1/4 cup soft cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup cranberry sauce
  • lettuce leaf
  1. Spread 2 tablespoons room temperature cream cheese on each slice of bread.
  2. Layer lettuce, turkey and cranberry sauce on one slice of bread and top with second slice.

My husband Steve likes his sandwiches “club” style. For him that means adding bacon.

Turkey Cranberry Club Sandwich

  • 1 1/2 ounces turkey
  • 2 slices bacon
  • 2 slices bread
  • 1/4 cup soft cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup cranberry sauce
  • 2 tablespoons walnut pieces
  • lettuce leaf
  1. Fry bacon until crisp, drain on paper towel and cut each slice in half.
  2. Spread 2 tablespoons room temperature cream cheese on each slice of bread.
  3. Press walnut pieces into cream cheese.
  4. Layer lettuce, turkey, bacon and cranberry sauce on one slice of bread and top with second slice.

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